The Joffrey Ballet Program

Thursday, August 18, 2011 ·

"To have this phenomenal ballet company with one of the best orchestras in the world at the same time is extraordinary," says DanceCleveland executive director Pam Young in Cleveland Magazine

Since 1968, many major dance companies have performed at The Cleveland Orchestra's Blossom Festival in Cuyahoga Valley National Park including, New York City Ballet, Vienna State Opera Ballet, Harkness Ballet, Joffrey Ballet, National Ballet, Pennsylvania Ballet, San Francesco Ballet, Feld Ballet, Houston Ballet.  In 2009, The Orchestra returned to partnering with the Joffrey Ballet, presenting 2 performances of the same program each season at Blossom.  The partnership continues this weekend with a special program of five diverse works from the Chicago company’s repertory.
  
The Orchestra will play from Blossom’s orchestra pit under the direction of Tito Muñoz, who served as assistant conductor of The Cleveland Orchestra from 2007 to 2010.  Mr. Muñoz conducted each of the Joffrey’s performances at Blossom during the past two summers, and toured with The Joffrey Ballet during the 2010-11 season.

Here is the program being performed at Blossom Music Center on Saturday, August 20, and Sunday, August 21, both at 8 p.m.
NIGHT
Choreography by JULIA ADAM
Music Composed by MATTHEW PIERCE
Costumes by BENJAMIN PIERCE
Lighting by LISA PINKHAM
Night, choreographed by Julia Adam, was premiered by the San Francisco Ballet in 2000. It
is a contemporary odyssey into one woman’s nocturnal dreams. This is a dance of flight
inspired by the dreamscape paintings of Marc Chagall. With a commissioned score by
Matthew Pierce, Adam creates the impression of flying, falling, and being chased.


 
 
OTHELLO-DUET (excerpt)
from Othello — A Dance in Three Acts
Choreography by LAR LUBOVITCH
Music by ELLIOT B. GOLDENTHAL
Scenery by GEORGE TSYPIN
Costumes by ANN HOULD-WARD
Lighting by PAT COLLINS
Projections by WENDALL K. HARRINGTON
Assistant Choreographer: GINGER THATCHER
Joffrey Premiere: October 2009
Special thanks to Rebecca Rigert and Scott Rink for their creative assistance.
Costumes executed by Barbara Matera
Set construction and painting by R.A. Reed Productions, Inc., Portland, Oregon
Projections produced by Eriksson Design, Inc., NYC
Othello — A Dance in Three Acts was given its World Premiere by American Ballet Theatre on
May 23, 1997, at the Metropolitan Opera House, New York, danced by Desmond Richardson
(Othello), Sandra Brown (Desdemona), Parrish Maynard (Iago), Martha Butler (Emilia), and
Keith Roberts (Cassio).
This production of Othello — A Dance in Three Acts was originally co-produced with the San
Francisco Ballet in collaboration with the Lar Lubovitch Dance Company.
CHOREOGRAPHER’S NOTE:
Othello — A Dance in Three Acts has been adapted from three sources. The Moor originated
as a story by Geraldo Cintio in The Hundred Tales and was published in Venice in 1566. The
characters and the basic plot of the Cintio tale were used by William Shakespeare for his play
Othello, The Moor of Venice, written around 1602 and later restructured and adapted for
Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Othello in 1887.
—Lar Lubovitch



AFTER THE RAIN
After the Rain© by CHRISTOPHER WHEELDON
Music by ARVO PÄRT
Staged by JASON FOWLER
Costumes Designed by HOLLY HYNES
Lighting by MARK STANLEY
Christopher Wheeldon’s After the Rain is a ballet of bold movements and heartfelt emotion. In Part I, danced to the first movement of Pärt’s Tabula Rasa, the three couples’ opening movements find the men lying on the floor with the women standing over them, en pointe, with their left legs thrust in the air. From that powerful image, the couples perform a series of intricate lifts and turns that often mirror one another. They are dressed in steel gray, reflecting the striking backdrop, in which a revolving palette of grays resembles glass covered with raindrops. The colors and mood shift dramatically in Part II, a pas de deux danced to Spiegel im Spiegel. The ballerina is dressed in pink and her partner is bare chested. In a series of unfolding partnering moves, the dancers explore the shifting emotions of their relationship. At times they are close and tender with one another, while at other times they inhabit the same space but are separated and searching for one another. The ballet is short in length–lasting about 22 minutes–but rich in invention and feeling. While many dance companies have performed parts of this work, The Joffrey Ballet is the first company outside of the company for which it was created to be awarded the rights to perform the piece in its entirety. Repertory notes courtesy of and adapted from New York City Ballet Online Repertory Index.


TSCHAIKOVSKY PAS DE DEUX
Choreography by GEORGE BALANCHINE
® The George Balanchine Trust
Costumes by BARBARA KARINSKA
Music: Excerpt from Act III of Swan Lake by PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY
Staged by VICTORIA SIMON
Lighting by THOMAS SKELTON 
 
The music for this piece was originally intended for the pas de deux in Act III of Swan
Lake. Because it was not published with the rest of the score, it remained unknown to Petipa and Ivanov when they were preparing to stage the St. Petersburg version. They substituted music from Act I, which became the famous “Black Swan” pas de deux.


STRAVINSKY VIOLIN CONCERTO
Choreography by GEORGE BALANCHINE
® The George Balanchine Trust
Music: Concerto in D by IGOR STRAVINSKY
Staged by MARIA CALEGARI and BART COOK
Lighting by MARK STANLEY
Blossom Festival Violin Soloist: Jung-Min Amy Lee
BALLET NOTES:
In 1941, Balanchine choreographed Balustrade for the Original Ballet Russe to Stravinsky’s
Violin Concerto in D. When he returned to the score three decades later, he could no longer
remember his original choreography, but Balanchine was not at all disturbed by the loss.
“What I did then was for then,” he said, “and what I wanted to do to this music for our
Stravinsky Festival... represented more than 30 years’ difference.” The new choreography,
rooted in Georgian folk dance, follows the score directly: An opening “Toccata” and a final
“Capriccio” enclose two central “Arias,” which form contrasting pas de deux for two different
couples. Repertory notes courtesy of and adapted from New York City Ballet Online
Repertory Index.

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